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20130121
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. c-span: i counted 27 different fbi files the you've gotten into in the back that you list. what value have they been to this book and how would they be different, how would the book be different? >> guest: i think they are good primary material part and the invasive wiretaps ra biographical material, and there are many files there but these are the ones in which the basic primary material and fbi material gathered at the ground level tends to be i think very reliable on the people that have been wiretapped like clarence jones who show in these conversations. when it get massaged through the headquarters and put to political use the materials to get distorted but there is nothing better than a verbatim wiretap transfer of somebody's telephone life. that's very revealing and often were showing quite the opposite character of the wiretaps are premised on in the and in fact what you will get is somebody talking about going to jail in the freedom movement and quite the noble character. c-span: how hard is it to get them? >> guest: not hard to get they are in the fbi reading room not
surprise was that j. edgar hoover and his fbi's campaign to destroy king politically, at least, was far more vicious, was far more relentless, and cruel, and i could imagine that public officials in the united states would do. how did i come to that conclusion? after a two or three year battle with the fbi and with my friends in the lbj library, part of the national archives, i was finally able to put together a mosaic of hundreds of fbi memos that went to the president. i saw how the president reacted to them, and didn't react to them. and even though great reporters have covered this story well, starting in '75 with the church hearings, i was appalled about that, and i don't want to be total alarmist, but when i see what the fbi has been empowered to do again, in investigating citizens, i have great pause. >> time for a few more questions. [inaudible] >> i changed my mind on really the central idea of the book. when i started out, a lot of very well-meaning dedicated white house aides and johnson cabinet officials told me that the president despised martin luther king, and why was i d
reasons. he wanted to destroy pat gray who was the interim fbi director after hoover. it had nothing to do with principle, had nothing to do with protecting the fbi from nixon. nixon was his ticket to becoming director, so he leaked in order to destroy gray and make nixon think well of felt and make felt the director. so the idea that he was a whistleblower or leaked to destroy richard nixon is completely untrue. >> so felt was a company guy? >> i'm sorry? >> felt was a company guy? >> the bureau was everything to him. it was his life, and being the directer of the bureau was a once in a lifetime opportunity, and he did everything in his power, engaging in dirty tricks, you know? fbi co-intel tactics to get to the directorship. and he flummoxed woodward. i don't think word woord really understood what was going on. >> do you feel he was misrepresented by woodward and bernstein? >> absolutely. i don't want fault woodward and bernstein's reporting in the fall of '72. what i fault is their book about the reporting. it's a fairy tale. >> we're following the death of -- [inaudible] bob woodward
the fbi that jack knew perfectly well that was the impression he would wear a trenchcoat because it afforded them protection in the field. he was given access to the medical records and he showed most events were wounded in the backcourt on the soles of their feet and it was an important break in this story to disprove what the troopers had been saying that the students opened fire and threw molotov cocktails. that is what i mean by pushing the envelope. >> years after that he would tell that story on himself. >> sounds like a saint to be. [laughter] later it became -- became considered inappropriate you was reluctant to acknowledgement now he has done it again with "scoop." ambassador young, that massacre is one example of jack bringing investigative reporting to the civil rights story also the fbi involvement killing, the meridian bombing, the attempted set up by the fbi that led to the rest of the klansman, murder in athens. tell me the impact of having that type of news coverage on the movement had on the national understanding of what was going on. >> we really understood th
, and it to look at the medical records of the students. and the administrator that he meant the fbi, which set new perfectly well that was the impression he was giving. he used to wear that pressed their cut in the trench coat that reporters just like fbi man because it afforded them a certain amount of protection sometimes in the field. anyway, he was given access to those medical records, and he showed that most of the students were wounded running away in the back. there were shot in the back or missiles of the feet. it was important break in a story to disprove what the troopers had been saying, that they had to find that the students had opened fire on them and have thrown molotov cocktails. so that is what i mean by pushing the envelope a little bit. >> he to five years after that he would tell that story on himself. >> that sounds like a saint to me. [laughter] >> i think later it would have been considered inappropriate to do such things when we writing her book. he was reluctant to go back and knowledge of hit and that. now he has done it again, and glad to see that. ambassador young, the
. there are other suspects that the fbi or both closely following and consulting with partner governments. i think based on my last conversation with the director that was just a few days ago he went to libya and tunisia and believes the investigation is proceeding. they are doing was a fight briefings with certain committees. i don't know about this committee, but i certainly hope that the fbi is able to investigate and identify and hold responsible lowest wage this attack against us and i think that based on their work they feel that they are pursuing some very positive leads. >> my understanding is the person that was held was released by a judge. that person has been released. so you don't know at this point who did it. >> i confirmed with the director who was in the meeting with their high officials that this person is basically under law enforcement surveillance forbidden to leave. the director told me that had been confirmed by him. >> just very briefly, no one has been held accountable or charged with this offense. before gadhafi was taken out, my understanding is the nation had 18 shipmen
now in the government. and you say, well, i don't mind the police or the fbi. well, the department of agriculture has a s.w.a.t. team. the fish and wildlife have a s.w.a.t. team. in fact, the fish and wildlife raided gibson guitar with guns drawn, took all their computer equipment and their wood and then didn't let 'em know what they were accused of for a year. but then when they final aaccused them of something, it was breaking a foreign regulation. a law in india they were accused of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking in india. those are the kind of stories we write about. >> host: how come you haven't heard about that before? >> guest: some of them you have heard. one of them's the case of john and judy selling bunnies in a little town in missouri. they were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, you can pay on our web site $90,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days you'll owe us $3.1 million. this is the kind of stuff that your government's doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confisc
to the fbi and when i came to washington, i passed the information to the cia, and ever since, i never even talked to the guy again in my life, and kerry used this individual who had been put in jail for 46 years, into promoting the idea that the vice president knew about it and authorized this type of an operation, and i was involved in getting the money for the contras. actually, i was in el salvador flying at the time when my wife called me, and told me there was a story in the miami herald saying about that, which i told her, "forget about it -- is nothing true to it." but she was very concerned because people doesn't know us and they read this in the paper, and it is very detrimental to you, to your family and your integrity. so i did go and testify in private with senator kerry. it was a very strong hearing and they didn't want to do it in an open hearing at the time, and then it took me well over a year to testify openly, and when they did, which i hoped c-span could cover it, because he made sure that c-span did cover the hearing with meleone rodriguez. and i specifically requested
that there is an fbi investigation going on, because i personally called the fbi director and i was told that they are making progress and that some things may or may not be right to take place in the not too distant future. >> we work on an ongoing basis so we can get behind and find out what happened and move beyond that. can you make that commitment to me? >> senator, in all fairness we do know what happened is very clear. were you at the briefings with the tapes? >> there was a briefing in the tapes that we all saw those of us that went through which made it crystal clear. we sat for several hours with our intel folks who described precisely what we were seeing. we saw all of the events unfold and we had a very complete and detailed description. >> we know what happened in benghazi because we have the reports. we don't know why we were misled. i'm just looking to make sure that your secretary -- swedes find out what the administration who knew and the american public. >> i don't want the people to be left with this impression when you say why we were misled, that implies an intent to
on at the federal and state level. so in alaska last year the fbi gave covenant house its community partner award for the work that we're doing to identify victims of sex trafficking and to work on the prosecution of those who traffic kids. in pennsylvania several weeks ago, um, covenant house in philadelphia led a coalition that successfully championed new safe harbor legislation that helps victims of sex trafficking. and that would be true throughout the united states, and, of course, in latin america where covenant house works in mexico, nicaragua, guatemala and in honduras, we work very directly including we co-prosecute some of those cases against the gangs and cartels who are trafficking kids who are as young as 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 years old. the work that we do to help victims recover depends on where that victim is in terms of their exploitation, their suffering. but it almost always involves, um, psychiatric counseling, helping young people begin to deal with rape and exploitation and then help them build a plan forward that's not very different that the work that we were doig, you know, 30 y
self, bob mueller, head of the fbi and keith alexander, head of the nsa, have worked very closely together to develop playbooks, and they are -- who has what roles and what responsibilities in different types of scenarios. nonetheless, what we know in supporting states is that our ability to dictate, prevent and mitigate is assisted materially based on whether we know something has occurred. so the idea of sharing, getting those, particularly when they infiltrated entity is part of the nation's critical infrastructure, that everybody else relies upon, is key. the ability to be able to undertake certain mitigation measures is key. the ability to have the freedom to hire personnel to the department without some of the restrictions of the civil service is key, because these, are areas which at one is competing for. so legislation that would have the effect of clarifying, making sure those roles and responsibilities are set forth in the statute. form should include and dealing with -- >> why don't you explain what that is? >> well, i'm going to let you explain it. spent finish your se
for that, fbi? >> will take whatever action is necessary to go after these people. >> mr. secretary, thank you. he said that this decision will make the military stronger. there will be an art critic so that premise. can you give us examples of how putting women in the military will make her campaign forces stronger? >> let me not limited to military. and they give you two observations. one is that graduated from west point in the team 74. it was in on the institution. i came back in 1976 to get married and watch the first class, they were pleased at the time. i watched the first class of women entered a wonderful would that be like. i'm back to teach at west point in 1884 and from the academy of far better place than when i was a cadet. i don't have time to explain why, but it had become better in almost every way, academically and physically, politically, just a better place. and i attribute a good bit of that to the fact we open up the academy to women. secondly, we've had this ongoing issue was harassed and, also. i believe it's because we've had separate classes of military personnel
has hampered the fbi's investigation success here is a matter of justice and it's also a matter of signaling to the militants that there is no place for them to hide if the attack u.s. personnel. i will now turn to the distinguished ranking member for his opening remarks. >> thank you mr. chairman for holding this important hearing. i hope that we can use this for an opportunity to seriously examine the steps that we need to take to end their reach peak of the tragedy in benghazi rather than engaging in the gotcha politics and in gauging the to achieving this bipartisan goal. madam secretary, as the new ranking member on the foreign affairs committee, what me say on behalf of the democratic members on this committee, we would like to welcome you back to the committee in regard that you are feeling better. this would likely be a final appearance before our committee and i want to take this opportunity to let you know how much we appreciate your outstanding and tireless efforts to represent our country in the international community. i have no doubt you will continue to serve the
of crimes or guilty of anything, but simply people that are somehow peripheral to an investigation. the fbi relies, in the first thing as what is a driver's license, like on television. so what kind of publications can you envision an estate like a worm where 40% of the people are carrying not for federal identification to the fbi director has touched by three times how important the real id act is for federal law enforcement. >> two things with that, and it's been very, very troublesome for us, again, it's hardcoded in the real id act itself that you have to mark a negative card. and a year ago we were two years and i specifically asked at an awards meeting at each is represented, we're having all the unintended consequent of the negative markings on the card, what is your recommendation? and the recommendation i got back was quit marking the card negatively than. which was a little bit stressful because it's hardcoded in real id act itself. and our 80 in delaware said have to abide by the law as it is written. but a lot of our citizens in delaware said okay, other states are not marking t
spending for the f.b.i., drug enforcement administration, the secret service, the u.s. marshals service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco, firearms and explosives. to argue this president is not enforcing the law when we have so many deportations and to argue he's not taking it seriously when we are spending record-breaking amounts on the border just isn't backed up by the facts. but still we need to make sure we're doing everything we can to keep the border safe and to reduce illegal immigration. that's the first thing. the second thing is to say that those who are here, if they want to be legal, have to earn their way to legal status. how do they earn it? first, they go through a criminal background check. we don't want anyone here who is a threat to our nation or to the people who live here. they'll be asked to leave. in fact, they'll be forced to leave. but those who pass the criminal background check, they'll need to pay a fine. they have to pay their taxes. and then they can stay and work in a legal probationary legal status while we make the border safe. ultimately they have to
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)